in Blogs, BoxGreen, Business, Startup

Persistence

*2 mins read*

Amidst all the media coverage, not all is bright and rosey behind the scene. (Still appreciate the support from everyone though!)

Spent the week in the KL office and realized there is still so much work needed to get business off the ground (lack of revenue, market exposure, hiring fit, managing people out, growth, you name it).

So while I was waiting for the flight back to SG, I fired up Pocket (an app for saving articles offline for later reading) and found a god-sent article buried deep in the list of articles that I’ve saved. Extract and link below.

TLDR: Take away the spotlight, tune out the noise and get back to the grind.

“while building and iterating on Justin.tv (long before launching Socialcam), there were many times I came to the brink of packing it up and moving on from the company that bears my name. Shameful? Perhaps, but I know the same thoughts have occurred at times to my co-founders, who are still with the company to this day.

The reasons? Take your pick: we need more traction, we need hockey-stick growth, we need more revenue, we need more buzz, we argue about management issues, we have diverging interests. In the past five years I have personally experienced all the startup failure cliches that exist.

When startups commit suicide, often the root problem can be traced back to a lack of product traction — it’s rare to find people willingly quitting companies with exploding metrics. But one thing that many entrepreneurs don’t realize is that patience and iteration are critical in achieving product market fit. Overnight successes might happen fast, but they never actually happen overnight.

Persistence isn’t just key — it is everything. Getting in the ring is hard, but staying in the ring is even harder, especially when you feel beaten down, tired and alone.

I can’t promise you will succeed if you stick with your startup. What I can promise is that if you give up, you won’t possibly succeed.”

http://techcrunch.com/2011/06/27/startups-don%25E2%2580%2599t-die-they-commit-suicide/